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new hmo standards for 1st ocober 2018
#1
Has anyone heard of the exact requirements for these new hmo standards coming into affect on 1st october 2018? according to my letting agent (I am the landlord) I will need a fire blanket (fine), extinguisher (ok) and more worryingly fire doors throughout the property. She can't tell me the exact regs/law/british standards which stated this but she was informed of these new standards 'on a course'...

the property is a HMO as it is a semi detached house with:

Underfloor storage for majority of the ground floor (only accessible from outside)
Ground floor hall, kitchen, utility annex and living/dining room with log burner (CO alarm in place)
1st floor landing, toilet, bathroom, 2 bedrooms
2nd floor unoccupied loft storage
interlinked mains smokes with battery backup throughout

At present there is a married couple in 1 bedroom and an unmarried couple in the other bedroom. Apparently because they are effectively 3 separate units this is an HMO. Maybe I should persuade the unmarried couple to get married!
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#2
I would speak to the the national landlords association https://www.landlords.org.uk/ (worth joining if you are a landlord but i like trade associations) we do their second tier support calls for fire so i know the people on the help line have some good knowledge
HMO's rules depend on if it needs a licences and what the local council wants
www.fia.uk.com

Technical Manager FIA

All comments and views are mine own and may not reflect the views of FIA
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#3
(16-04-2018, 12:46 PM)Will Lloyd Wrote: I would speak to the the national landlords association https://www.landlords.org.uk/ (worth joining if you are a landlord but i like trade associations) we do their second tier support calls for fire so i know the people on the help line have some good knowledge
HMO's rules depend on if it needs a licences and what the local council wants

Thanks will it seems like a minefield
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#4
Hi,

As I understand it, it is simply redefining what a HMO is, which now includes smaller properties, so smaller properties will need to be licensed in the same way as larger HMO's, and the local authority set the standards for what is needed to be licensed.

Google search HMO Regulations 2018!

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/...tents/made

Bill
"it is lit up like a Xmas tree and I cant shut it up, has not worked since you installed it in 2015, is it still under warranty?"
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#5
The widening of HMO licensing doesn't automatically bring changes with it in physical precautions, however most LA's would apply the LACORS guidance when setting requirements:
https://www.rla.org.uk/docs/LACORSFSguideApril62009.PDF

Note in the guidance that if it's a smaller, lower risk premises you might not need to change the doors and depending on the fire alarm coverage you may not need cold smoke seals.
Anthony Buck
Fire Safety Technical Lead @ BAFE SP205 accredited company
Extinguisher specialist

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=65...415&ref=ts
http://www.youtube.com/user/contactacb
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-buck/22/957/36b
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#6
(17-04-2018, 12:12 AM)AnthonyB Wrote: The widening of HMO licensing doesn't automatically bring changes with it in physical precautions, however most LA's would apply the LACORS guidance when setting requirements:
https://www.rla.org.uk/docs/LACORSFSguideApril62009.PDF

Note in the guidance that if it's a smaller, lower risk premises you might not need to change the doors and depending on the fire alarm coverage you may not need cold smoke seals.

Thanks all!

Anthony by LA i assume you mean local authority? Does that mean different areas could have different standards? Do these different LA's have authority to decide themselves?
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#7
Yes, LA = Local Authority.

Before unified guidance they all did their own thing and requirements could vary between councils. They should all follow LACORS, but I hear there are all sort of quirks between LAs and interpretations and standards of fire safety knowledge can vary, it's not unusual for them to come up with complete bunkum that you have to challenge.

Like requiring a service certificate for a Grade D system despite there only being a requirement for the user's test and a 6 monthly vacuum......
Anthony Buck
Fire Safety Technical Lead @ BAFE SP205 accredited company
Extinguisher specialist

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=65...415&ref=ts
http://www.youtube.com/user/contactacb
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-buck/22/957/36b
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#8
There has been a change of definition of HMO, a lot more properties will now be classed as HMO which is a good thing generally. However, I think your letting agent is incorrect, it's three or more households that will now be classed as HMO. Married or not, they are still only one household. The comments above are correct, most LA's follow LACORS, but there are still a lot that have their own flavour. But in a nutshell I don't think you will be classed as HMO, but you should speak with your LA for confirmation. There are two types of HMO licensing, Mandatory and selective. Selective is where LA's differ. Mandatory is set by government.
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#9
(20-04-2018, 09:34 AM)Michaelwgroves Wrote: There has been a change of definition of HMO, a lot more properties will now be classed as HMO which is a good thing generally. However, I think your letting agent is incorrect, it's three or more households that will now be classed as HMO. Married or not, they are still only one household. The comments above are correct, most LA's follow LACORS, but there are still a lot that have their own flavour. But in a nutshell I don't think you will be classed as HMO, but you should speak with your LA for confirmation. There are two types of HMO licensing, Mandatory and selective. Selective is where LA's differ. Mandatory is set by government.

Ok thanks. So i shouldfind out who my LA is and ask them...
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#10
(20-04-2018, 03:01 PM)alonso Wrote:
(20-04-2018, 09:34 AM)Michaelwgroves Wrote: There has been a change of definition of HMO, a lot more properties will now be classed as HMO which is a good thing generally. However, I think your letting agent is incorrect, it's three or more households that will now be classed as HMO. Married or not, they are still only one household. The comments above are correct, most LA's follow LACORS, but there are still a lot that have their own flavour. But in a nutshell I don't think you will be classed as HMO, but you should speak with your LA for confirmation. There are two types of HMO licensing, Mandatory and selective. Selective is where LA's differ. Mandatory is set by government.

Ok thanks. So i shouldfind out who my LA is and ask them...

Absolutely, your LA will give you the definitive answer, but please post back their response so we all know.
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