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Travel distance for callpoints
#1
BS 5839-1 travel distance - "no one need travel more than 45 m"

Say a hotel corridor of sixty metres in length with a staircase at each end, so a callpoint located as you go into the staircase (corridor side, so it's visible along the staircase). Person comes out of bedroom no. 3 but cannot go to the callpoint down the corridor that's very close to the left because their route is blocked due to a fire, so has to go to the right towards the callpoint at the other end, but that's more than 45 metres away. Therefore do we need a callpoint, say, the middle of the corridor?

If no such central callpoint in the corridor and you're at the bedroom in the centre, 45 metres one way plus 45 metres the other is a total of 90, so callpoints are okay being ninety metres apart?
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#2
20.2 Recommendations
The following recommendations are applicable.
a) The method of operation of all MCPs in a system should be that of type A as specified in BS EN
54-11. All call points should be identical unless there is a special reason for differentiation.
NOTE 1 The Type A manual call point is defined in BS EN 54-11 as follows. “Type A Direct operation. A
manual call point in which the change to the alarm condition is automatic (i.e. without the need for further
manual action) when the frangible element is broken or displaced.”
NOTE 2 The fitting of a protective cover to the type A manual call point is not deemed to conflict with 20.2a).
b) All MCPs should be fitted with a protective cover, which is moved to gain access to the frangible
element.
c) The delay between operation of an MCP and the giving of an “Evacuate” signal in, at least, the
alarm zone within which the call point is located should not exceed 3 s.
NOTE 3 BS EN 54-2 permits a delay of up to 10 s in the response of control equipment; accordingly, a delay of
10 s might be acceptable, subject to the agreement of the relevant enforcing authority and the recording of the
delay as a variation on the completion certificate.
BS 5839-1:2017 BRITISH STANDARD
48 © THE BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION 2017 – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
d) MCPs should be located on escape routes and, in particular, at all storey exits and all exits to open
air that lead to an ultimate place of safety (whether or not the exits are specifically designated as
fire exits).
Those located at storey exits may be sited within the accommodation or on the landing of a
stairway to which the storey exit gives access (see Figure 6). In multi-storey buildings with
phased evacuation, in which only a limited number of floors are evacuated at one time, only
the former option applies; under these circumstances, MCPs should not be located on stairway
landings, as persons travelling down the stairway might operate an MCP several floors below
that on which a fire is located, resulting in evacuation of inappropriate areas.
e) Distribution of MCPs should be such that no one need travel more than 45 m [except where
20.2f) applies] to reach the nearest MCP, measured along the route that a person would actually
follow taking into account the layout of walls, partitions and fittings. If, at the design stage, the
final layout of the premises is unknown, the maximum straight line distance between any point
in the building and the nearest MCP should not exceed 30 m [except where 20.2f) applies]; after
final fit out of the premises, the limit of 45 m should still then apply.
NOTE 4 These distances are arbitrary, but reflect the maximum acceptable distances between any point and
the nearest storey exit commonly applied to many premises.
f) The figures of 45 m and 30 m recommended in e) should be reduced to 25 m and 16 m,
respectively, in the following circumstances:
1) where a significant proportion of occupants have limited mobility and it can reasonably be
anticipated that one of these occupants will be the appropriate person to first operate the
fire alarm system in the event of fire; or
2) where processes in the area result in the likelihood of rapid fire development (e.g. where
there is use, or processing, of highly flammable liquids or flammable gases).
g) Where specific equipment or activities result in a high fire hazard level (e.g. kitchens or cellulose
paint spraying), a MCP should be sited in close proximity.
NOTE 5 In both examples given in g) other considerations also apply. Kitchens or food preparation areas
might require the use of a non-glass frangible element to avoid the possibility of food contamination with
glass fragments. The spraying area might require the use of equipment certified for use in potentially explosive
atmospheres (see Clause 10).
h) In buildings with phased evacuation, additional MCPs are necessary to ensure that a MCP is
located at every designated exit from an alarm zone.
i) MCPs should be fixed at a height of 1.4 m above finished floor level, at easily accessible, wellilluminated
and conspicuous positions free from potential obstruction. They should be sited
against a contrasting background to assist in easy recognition. A lower mounting height is
acceptable in circumstances where there is a high likelihood that the first person to raise an
alarm of fire will be a wheelchair user.
NOTE 6 The measurement ought to be made between the finished floor level and the centre point of the
frangible element.
NOTE 7 The figure of 1.4 m is arbitrary, but reflects long established custom and practice. A minor difference
(e.g. less than 300 mm) in mounting height (e.g. to align with the mounting height of light switches) need not
be regarded as significant, nor need it be recorded as a variation.
NOTE 8 Guidance in support of national building regulations (e.g. in England and Wales, Approved Document
M [6] under the Building Regulations 2010 [2]) recommends that switches and controls be mounted no higher
than 1.2 m above floor level, so that they are accessible for disabled people.
BRITISH STANDARD BS 5839-1:2017
© THE BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION 2017 – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 49
j) MCPs may be flush-mounted in locations where they will be seen readily, but, where they will
be viewed from the side (e.g. corridors), they should be surface mounted or only semi-recessed
with the front face proud of the mounting surface by no less than 15 mm.
k) In public car parks, any use of an emergency voice communication system in lieu of MCPs should
be subject to approval by the relevant enforcing authority, and the system should conform to BS
5839-9. All outstations should be Type B outstations in accordance with BS 5839-9. The master
station should be sited in a permanently manned location, such as a control room.
Peter Robinson




07889 038650

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#3
(06-11-2019, 06:12 PM)rtfm Wrote: BS 5839-1 travel distance - "no one need travel more than 45 m"

Say a hotel corridor of sixty metres in length with a staircase at each end, so a callpoint located as you go into the staircase (corridor side, so it's visible along the staircase). Person comes out of bedroom no. 3 but cannot go to the callpoint down the corridor that's very close to the left because their route is blocked due to a fire, so has to go to the right towards the callpoint at the other end, but that's more than 45 metres away. Therefore do we need a callpoint, say, the middle of the corridor?

no there is no need to discount call points in the same way as exits

(06-11-2019, 06:12 PM)rtfm Wrote: If no such central callpoint in the corridor and you're at the bedroom in the centre, 45 metres one way plus 45 metres the other is a total of 90, so callpoints are okay being ninety metres apart?

yes
www.fia.uk.com

Technical Manager FIA

All comments and views are mine own and may not reflect the views of FIA
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#4
With Will as at design stage you cannot compensate for an exit that may get blocked , its how you see it at the time in normal conditions.
All posts are of my own opinion and knowledge and do not reflect the views of the Company I work for.
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#5
If you are in a hotel and need to reach a call point to raise an alarm of fire, you are likely to be running into the corridor and away from the fire, so it’s unlikely that the route would be blocked at this stage. A Hotel should have AFD to at least L3, so the alarm should be raised automatically if the corridor is the point of origin, so if you are entering the corridor due to the alarm already being raised, the unavailability of the nearest MCP becomes irrelevant, as the bells would already be ringing. If your designing a new system for a hotel, it’s unlikely that it would be a manual only one.

Travel distance to an MCP is not the same as evacuation travel distance though, and corridors giving access to alternative stair exits that are over 30m in length would generally be subdivided around the mid point as part of the passive protection designed into the building and provision of places of relative safety.
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#6
The system would be to L1, and the long corridor would have a fire door in the middle. I appreciate that the system is going to have activated already from a detector, but wasn't sure if you needed to disregard this and thinking of distances to MCPs in their own right
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